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Posts Tagged ‘command line’

Remote support and process manipulation

May 28th, 2010 No comments

Sometimes I help friends that make their first steps in Linux world/shell scripting/etc. I’ve found that the best way to give remote technical support is over a “shared” terminal window. It can be done with screen commnad (short tutorial here) or kibitz which is part of the standard expect package. The basic operation is similar: the side that needs to be controlled creates the “shared” terminal, the other side first connects to the same machine (telnet/ssh) and then “attaches” to the shared terminal.

This scenario, although reasonable has couple of limitations. First, to support someone, a new shared environment has to be established. You can’t attach to existing terminal window (unless inside “screen” already) which is inconvenient. Second, a shell access is needed before attaching to the shared terminal (unnecessary privilege) and third, you can’t connect to the shared terminal (as server) which could have been really usable for NAT/Firewall bypassing via reverse ssh tunneling.

How can we address those problems? We need a small program that can duplicate existing process’ file descriptors (stdin/stdout/stderr) and bind them to either another terminal (pty device) or network sockets. I couldn’t find anything that does exactly this but I found another cool stuff that does similar/related things that I’d like to share. I think I’m gonna write my own tool, based on the stuff I found (long live open source!) but ’till then, you can check these out:

Output redirection of running process using gdb. This method uses gdb‘s ability to attach to already running process, freeze it’s normal execution, run arbitrary code and continue. In this particular method stdout is closed and reassigned to another file. Pretty neat! Here, the same method is used but instead of closing stdout, it is duplicated to a new file descriptor.

Retty is a “tiny tool that lets you attach processes running on other terminals”, which means you can reattach to any open terminal window (for example text editor, mail client etc…) from any window. The original session would be destroyed though. Unfortunately, retty can’t run on amd64 platforms (like mine) because it injects i386 assembly instructions into running processes. Retty’s functionality can be achieved, again, using gdb method with this script.

Neercs is very similar to screen but has unique features such as grabbing a process that wasn’t initially started inside it, different window layouts etc. It is based on libcaca, so when I built it I had to manually get latest version of libcaca, build it, and then build neercs against it (if anyone need help with this just leave a comment). Neercs uses similar grabbing mechanism to retty’s, but they made both i386 and x86_64 assembly. From my tests it’s little less responsive than screen and it has problems passing F keys and Alt-* keystrokes.

Another cool program is CryoPID – process freezer for Linux. It captures the state of a running process and saves it to a file. The process can be resumed later even on another machine. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get it compiled on Ubuntu 9.10 and there is no Launchpad package as well :(

That’s all. If anyone has better solutions I’ll be glad to hear them.

Sending mail from command line

May 20th, 2010 No comments

Recently I wanted to add mail sending functionality to one of my scripts. This script runs on my desktop computer, so no fancy company mail servers/fixed IP/DNS records for me. When I googled it up I saw many different methods in varying complexity. My need was the simplest you can think of- just to send email. I didn’t care if it’s always from the same address. My solution was to use Ubuntu’s default exim4 mail server, with Gmail. Exim authenticates with your gmail user/password and the mail is always sent from the same address (user@gmail.com). This is heavily based on this, although a little different.

First I had to install exim4-config, so:
# sudo apt-get install exim4-config

Then I needed to configure exim to work with Gmail:
# sudo dpkg-reconfigure exim4-config

My selections:

  • General type of mail configuration: mail sent by smarthost; no local mail
  • System mail name: localhost
  • IP-address to listen: 127.0.0.1
  • Other destinations for which mail is accepted: (leave blank)
  • Visible domain name for local users: localhost
  • IP address or host name of the outgoing smarthost: smtp.gmail.com::587
  • Keep number of DNS-queries minimal: no
  • Split configuration into small files: no
  • Root and postmaster mail recipient: (leave blank)

Edit /etc/exim4/passwd.client (you can use gedit if you’re not comfortable with vi):
# sudo vi /etc/exim4/passwd.client

Add those lines (replace “user” and “password” with your own):

gmail-smtp.l.google.com:user@gmail.com:password
*.google.com:user@gmail.com:password
smtp.gmail.com:user@gmail.com:password

Finally update (refresh) exim configuration:
# sudo update-exim4.conf

That’s about it. To send the contents of /etc/motd as mail (just example):
# cat /etc/motd | mail -a “FROM: user@gmail.com” -a “BCC: somemail@somedomain.com” -s “This is the subject” recipient@somedomain.com

The “BCC:” is optional of course. If you don’t specify “FROM:” the default is the current user.

If you don’t have the “mail” command then just install mailutils:
# sudo apt-get install mailutils

Happy mailing!

Cool command line stuff

May 7th, 2010 4 comments

I made this list of cool things you can do from shell especially for desktop users. They all work on my ubuntu and most of them generic (except maybe apt-get which works for debian based distrubtions). The list is not ordered or categorized. It’s really just a bunch of things a little different from the regular text manipulation one-liners. They are all useful, at least for me.

Note: if you copy-paste notice that wordpress screws the quotes, just use the regular double quotes wherever specified.

Make cd/dvd image copy
# dd if=/dev/cdrom bs=1024k of=my_cd.iso

Make cd/dvd image copy to remote computer
I use my old computer’s drive, mine got broken:
# dd if=/dev/cdrom bs=1024k | ssh remote_computer “cat > my_cd.iso”

Mount existing cd/dvd image copy (iso file)
# mkdir /tmp/my_cd
# sudo mount -t loop my_cd.iso /tmp/my_cd

When you finish don’t forget to:
# sudo umount /tmp/my_cd
# rmdir /tmp/my_cd

Use last parameter from last command with !$
# mkdir -p really/long/path/that/you/hate/typing
# cd !$

Find all files containing a certain text
Let’s say we want to find all files under /usr/include named “*.h” containing¬† _REGEX_H:
# find /usr/include -name “*.h” -exec grep -l “_REGEX_H” {} \;

Convert between character sets
Make sure you have “libc-bin” installed (sudo apt-get install libc-bin)
# curl -L http://www.idown.me | iconv -f windows-1255 -t utf-8

Read sent/received SMS from your jailbroken iphone
Make sure you have “sqlite3″ installed (sudo apt-get install sqlite3)
# scp root@your_iphone_ip:/private/var/mobile/Library/SMS/sms.db .
# sqlite3 sms.db “select * from message”

Incrementally backup directory to external hard drive
Note: this command is dangerous as it will delete your destination dir. It’s good if you want 1:1 copy of directory and want to be able to sync only changes in future (file removal from source directory also considered change and will be replicated next time you execute). The –modify-window keeps files timestamps and useful when you sync from EXT2/3 filesystem to FAT32.
# rsync -rot –inplace –delete –progress –modify-window=2 source_dir destination_dir

Disable compiz window manager (without killing current desktop session)
# DISPLAY=$DISPLAY metacity –replace &

Enable compiz window manager (without killing current desktop session)
# DISPLAY=$DISPLAY compiz –replace &

Local port forwarding
We will listen on port 4545 and forward to local port 22 (ssh):
# mknod tmp_pipe p
# nc -kl 4545 0<tmp_pipe | nc localhost 22 1>tmp_pipe

Now you can try ssh localhost -p 4545. You can also forward to remote host, just replace localhost with the host you want.

Track your Dominos pizza order
Well, I’ve no idea if it works as it is for US citizens only, but you can check out the script here.