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Posts Tagged ‘iphone’

iPhone tethering with Ubuntu

June 12th, 2010 15 comments

Today was my first time I used iPhone tethering. Tethering means connecting computer to the internet using iPhone’s cellular connectivity (3G/EDGE). The iPhone connects to the computer via USB cable or Bluetooth and uses as a cellular modem. It’s useful when you’re away with a laptop and no wireless hot spots around.

There are many tutorials out there, however I found most of them misleading (advising to use third party software or jailbreak your iPhone – both unnecessary) and none of them for Linux. This tutorial is really easy and simple.

Step 1 – Enable internet sharing on your iPhone
On your iPhone goto Settings -> General -> Network -> Internet sharing -> On. If “Internet sharing” isn’t shown, open Safari and browse to: http://help.benm.at. On this webpage click on “Tethering”, then select your country and your mobile carrier. Accept the profile and reboot your iPhone. After the reboot “Internet sharing” option is supposed to be shown. In my case, my carrier wasn’t on the list so I generated a custom file (the last option). The APN/User/Password were easily found using Google. However, “Internet sharing” stayed hidden. The funny thing is after I removed the custom profile it magically appeared. My iPhone version is 3.1.2 and it worked. I noticed they have warning for 3.1.3 so watch out if you got it.

Step 2 – Install necessary software on Ubuntu
As always, I provide instructions for Ubuntu. The driver you need is called “ipheth” and it depends on “libimobiledevice”. Now, you can find them both on Lucid’s official repositories. However, only version 0.9.7 of libimobiledevice is there, and while it may be enough for tethering, I recommend using the newer version which can be obtained from Paul McEnery PPA (for Karmic it’s still version 0.9.7):

# sudo add-apt-repository ppa:pmcenery/ppa

Executing: gpg –ignore-time-conflict –no-options –no-default-keyring –secret-keyring /etc/apt/secring.gpg –trustdb-name /etc/apt/trustdb.gpg –keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg –primary-keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg –keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com –recv 3AE22276BF4F39C8D6117D7F4EA3A911D48B8E25
gpg: requesting key D48B8E25 from hkp server keyserver.ubuntu.com

gpg: key D48B8E25: public key “Launchpad PPA for Paul McEnery” imported
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:               imported: 1  (RSA: 1)

# sudo apt-get update

Now, install the driver (and it’s dependencies, which include  the library):
# sudo apt-get install ipheth-utils

Load the driver into running kernel
# sudo modprobe ipheth

At this point if you enter “dmesg” the last line should show something like “usbcore: registered new interface driver ipheth”

Step 3 – Plug your iPhone using USB cable
As soon as you connect your device a new interface should be plumbed, configured and ready to be used (in case you use network manager). You can get list of your interfaces with “ifconfig -a”. On your iPhone there suppose to be label saying “Internet Tethering”. If you don’t use network manager the “Internet Tethering” is triggered when you make DHCP request on that interface (for example, using “dhclient”).

That’s it. As promised, easy and simple. Thanks to Paul McEnery there are plenty of other cool iPhone related stuff you can install from his PPA (on Lucid).

Enjoy!

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

April 29th, 2010 No comments

Today, Canonical will release Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (long term support). I’m usually not so enthusiastic about new Ubuntu releases, but this time is different. They added some sweet features, well, at least for me, which didn’t get proper public relations. This is not a comprehensive review of the new features. It’s about new features I find cool or bad enough writing about, from a desktop user point of view.

First, I must say I love Ubuntu. In each release they turn some of the most annoying tasks (for linux newbies) into trivial and intuitive. It has great documentation, community support and amazing software package repositories. It is also widely supported by third party vendors. Second, they usually add performance boosts and cool new features with new releases. Third, you can order official CDs for free. What’s not to love ?

So, what do we get this time ? As always with ‘LTS’ releases, three years of (bug/security fixes) support. A fresh new beginner’s getting-started manual which looks very promising. Some crap as well: new look and feel and social networks integration. As if it’s that hard to change the look or use all-in-one social networks client…

Performance boosts. First, boot speed improvement. They already made a big leap from 9.04 to 9.10, and now again ? sounds delicious. “Super fast” boot for SSD based machines such as netbooks. Sounds very delicious. Second, faster suspend/resume for your netbook that will “extend battery life”. Excuse me for being skeptical, but come on… improving speeds are always good, but declaring it will save battery ? I don’t buy it.

Ubuntu One enhancements. I never got the deal around Ubuntu One. It suppose to be a personal cloud that keeps your files, notes, bookmarks and contacts on the net, but we already had these services long time ago (for example Gmail’s contacts which can be synced to your mobile, Dropbox file storage, or Delicious bookmarks). Anyway the new enhancements are better desktop integration, and new Music Store. For me, they’re both useless but I guess Canonical deserves it’s chance to fight Apple’s music store, plus, it’s DRM-free.

Software Center 2.0. Supposedly better interface for software installation and maintenance. I haven’t seen this one yet, but it sounds just like a GUI facelift. The underlaying software deployment mechanisms stay the same (apt/ppa repositories).

The sweet features I mentioned in the prologue: inclusion of libimobiledevice in official repositories. This is a software library that supports iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad devices. Programs built on this library provides filesystem access, music/video sync, internet tethering, apps installation, springboard icon management, gnome integration, and much more ! I’ve no idea how it got such a lousy public relations but for me that’s the real killer app !

EDIT: For now only version 0.9.7 of libimobiledevice is in the repositories. It means that only music sync can be done out of the box. It’s a shame. Two weeks ago, I asked the official maintainer of the packages to make packages for 1.0.0, and I thought he told me it would be included in Lucid release, but I misunderstood him. He actually told me that it’s too close to Lucid’s release for inclusion. I apologize for the (partially) wrong information. Anyhow, one can still build 1.0.0 from sources and use it. If there would be enough demand I would write an How-To guide. Leave a comment or send mail if you’re interested.